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Transportation and Communities Summit 2019 (September 19 - 20, 2019 at Portland State University) This annual event in Portland, Oregon connects national mobility-focused research to equitable practice and policy through breakout panels, Lightning Talks, student posters, skill-building workshops, and a keynote from urban data scientist Ben Wellington.

⇨ CLICK HERE TO REGISTER ⇦ 
--Summit Day Pass (Sept 19): $250
------Nonprofit / Student Rate: $75
------Elected Official Rate: $95
--Workshop Half-Day Ticket (Sept 20): $95
--Workshop Full-Day Ticket (Sept 20): $190
Current members of our Community Partners get a $20 discount to the Summit Day. Contact us at asktrec@pdx.edu for a discount code. All sessions will be submitted for pre-approval to AICP, and are eligible for self-reporting to PDH for continuing education credits.

Hosted by the Transportation Research and Education Center at Portland State University, and supported by our U.S. DOT grant-funded consortium: the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC).

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Thursday, September 19
 

7:15am

Continental Breakfast + Check In
Thursday September 19, 2019 7:15am - 8:00am
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

8:00am

Welcome to Transportation and Communities Summit 2019
Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Dill, PhD

Jennifer Dill, PhD

Director, Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC), Portland State University
Director of TREC and the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), Jennifer is also a professor of urban studies and planning. She is an internationally cited researcher on sustainable transportation. Among her research projects are Lessons from the Green Lanes... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 8:00am - 8:15am
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

It's a Two-Way Street: An Interconnected Approach to Affordable Housing and Transportation Investments
Affordable Housing as a Travel Demand Management Strategy
Reid Ewing, University of Utah
This study is investigating the state of practice of affordable housing strategies and researching the influence and impact of affordable housing on travel demand. Researchers at the beginning constructed a matrix of 20 tools which are using or suggesting to use at 10 municipalities across the Utah state for implementation of affordable housing and then identified whether providing affordable housing for different income groups near employment centers impacts travel behavior differently.

Housing, Transportation, Nature and Equitable Growth
Megan Gibb, Metro
The Portland metropolitan region’s enviable quality of life can be attributed in part to the 2040 Growth Concept, a vision for growth that emphasizes compact urban form and protecting access to nature. Connecting housing and employment with transit and transportation options are central to this vision and Metro’s investments in Transit Oriented Development and Transportation Demand Management programs have helped partners across the region make these connections as our region has grown over the last two decades. Despite our region’s success in many ways, housing affordability has become a regional crisis. In 2018, voters approved a Regional Affordable Housing Bond to produce 3900 affordable housing units in the region. This new resource allows Metro and its partners to further link affordable housing with access to transit and transportation options particularly for those who have been underserved.

Innovative Partnerships Towards Accessible Transportation Options
Duncan Hwang, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Tenants of a new affordable apartment building in Portland’s Jade District will have free access to Car2go. The nonprofits APANO and ROSE Community Development Corporation teamed up with the car-sharing company to offer free car-sharing trips, along with technology and multi-lingual education to help people access the service, in a location at the edge of Car2go’s current service area. This project will explore how subsidized car-sharing trips, culturally-responsive education, and travel assistance can help to provide better travel options for affordable housing residents. Learn more about the pilot project.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Bandana Shrestha

Bandana Shrestha

Community Engagement Director, AARP Oregon
Bandana Shrestha is the Director of Community Engagement for AARP Oregon. She leads AARP’s livable community work in Oregon including growing and supporting the Network of Age-friendly Communities in the state, advocating for policies and program that enhance affordable and accessible... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Megan Gibb

Megan Gibb

Land Use & Urban Development Manager, Planning and Development, Metro
Megan Gibb, AICP, has been at Metro, the Portland area regional planning agency for 12 years and currently manages the Land Use and Urban Development group.  Her portfolio includes the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Program, the 2040 Planning Grant Program, the long range planning... Read More →
avatar for Duncan Hwang, J.D.

Duncan Hwang, J.D.

Associate Director, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)
Duncan Hwang grew up in a Taiwanese-American household in rural upper Michigan. He first became politicized while attending the University of Michigan where he obtained his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Asian Studies. During this time he worked on numerous civic engagement... Read More →
avatar for Reid Ewing, PhD

Reid Ewing, PhD

Distinguished Professor, University of Utah
Reid Ewing, Ph.D., is a Distinguished Professor of City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah, associate editor of the Journal of the American Planning Association, and columnist for Planning magazine. He holds master’s degrees in Engineering and City Planning from... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Passing through Safely: Design Guidance for Protected Bike Lanes at Intersections
Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes
Christopher Monsere, Portland State University
Separated bike lanes have become increasingly common around the United States as cities seek to attract the new riders, including the Interested but Concerned demographic of people who want to ride but limit their riding because they do not feel comfortable riding with motor vehicle traffic. Planners and engineers are still struggling with identifying contextually appropriate, safe, and comfortable designs for intersection locations, where bicyclist paths cross the paths of turning vehicles as well as cross-traffic. This presentation summarizes the recently completed NITC project "Contextual Guidance at Intersections for Protected Bicycle Lanes" which employed a combination of user surveys and simulations to anticipate expected bicyclist and turning vehicle interactions and bicyclist comfort based on design type and volumes. Findings suggest that, of the design types tested, bicycle signals and protected intersections have the highest expected comfort. 

Safety and Nonoptimal Usage of a Protected Bicycle Intersection -- A before-and-after case study in Salt Lake City, UT 
Torrey Lyons, University of Utah
Growth in bicycle trips in the US has increased the demand for infrastructure that safely integrates this mode with motorized users at intersections. Protected bicycle intersections have been implemented across the US and Canada, and the safety of these intersections is just starting to be understood. We examine a protected intersection in Salt Lake City, UT using before and after video analysis. We find changes to nonoptimal behaviors and near collisions in response to the introduction of the intersection configuration.

Additional presentations to be announced.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Wendy Cawley

Wendy Cawley

Traffic Safety Engineer, Portland Bureau of Transportation, City of Portland
Wendy Cawley, P.E. has worked for the City of Portland, Oregon since 1997. For the past 10 years she has been the Traffic Safety Engineer for the City’s High Crash Corridor/Vision Zero Program. Wendy works in the Traffic Design Section on a variety of projects ranging from small... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Espinosa, P.E.

Sarah Espinosa, P.E.

Project Manager, TriMet
Sarah Espinosa is a project manager for TriMet Engineering and Construction Division. She is a professional civil engineer with 16 plus years of experience on projects in the Portland Metro area. Her project background includes design and construction of private development and small... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Monsere, PhD

Christopher Monsere, PhD

Department Chair & Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland State University
Dr. Christopher M. Monsere is Professor and Chair of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the in the Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science at Portland State University. He is also an affiliated faculty member of the School of Urban Studies & Planning (USP). Monsere received... Read More →
avatar for Torrey Lyons, PhD

Torrey Lyons, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Torrey Lyons is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he is working under Dr. Noreen McDonald. He received his Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies from the University of Vermont, a Master of Public Policy from the University of Utah... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

8:30am

Counting the Underrepresented in Transportation Data: Bicyclists and Pedestrians
Non-motorized Counting: An Overview of Current Applications, Challenges and Future Trends
Sirisha Kothuri, Portland State University
Non-motorized counts are useful in facility design, for funding and policy decisions, to show changes over time, in planning, public health and safety. This presentation presents an overview of the non-motorized counting process, latest research findings and new avenues for research exploration.

Building a Non-Motorized Counts Program in Bend Oregon: A Partnership Story
Josh Roll, Oregon Department of Transportation
Transportation planning staff in Bend, Oregon have developed a traffic counts program that collects all users of the road. With technical support from Oregon Department of Transportation, they are solving multiple technical issues such as how to streamline the deployment of sensors and the transmitting, processing, and summarizing of the collected data. These data are then put to use in crash analysis helpful to understand systemic risk for non-motorized users of the system.

Caltrans and Multimodal Planning with Big Data 
Matthew Pettit, Streetlight Data
The California Department of Transportation, Caltrans worked with big data to derive several key bicycle and pedestrian transportation analytics using the StreetLight Data software platform that uses machine learning on millions of cell phone pings from location-based services and GPS points in North America.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Jen Duthie, PhD

Jen Duthie, PhD

Division Manager, Arterial Management, City of Austin, Texas
Jen Duthie leads the Arterial Management Division (AMD) of the City of Austin Transportation Department. AMD is responsible for the design, construction, and maintenance of traffic signals and related systems, as well as managing traffic in real-time through the Mobility Management... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sirisha Kothuri, PhD

Sirisha Kothuri, PhD

Senior Research Associate, Portland State University
Sirisha Kothuri, Ph.D. is a senior research associate in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Portland State University. Dr. Kothuri’s primary research interests are in the areas of multimodal traffic operations, bicycle and pedestrian counting, and safety. Dr... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Pettit

Matthew Pettit

Solution Engineer, Streetlight Data
Matt has 7 years of experience working on interdisciplinary teams across government, engineering consulting, and data/software vendors, within and outside the transportation industry. Before joining StreetLight Data as a Solution Engineer, Matt was an Applications Engineer at Citilabs... Read More →
avatar for Josh Roll

Josh Roll

Active and Sustainable Research Coordinator, Oregon Department of Transportation
Josh Roll is the Active and Sustainable Transportation Research Coordinator for the Oregon Department of Transportation where he coordinates and conducts research. Josh has experience in most elements of the analyses process, starting with data collection and wrangling, data processing... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

10:00am

(Break)
Thursday September 19, 2019 10:00am - 10:15am
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

10:15am

Mitigating the Impacts of Transportation Infrastructure on Housing Displacement
Land Development Monitoring System for the Portland Metropolitan Area
Al Mowbray, Metro Data Resource Center
In 2015 Metro’s Data Resource Center (DRC) began development of a Land Development Monitoring System (LDMS) to examine development trends in the Portland metropolitan region over time. The LDMS identifies land parcels developed over a given time period and both categorizes and quantifies the changes identified. The LDMS results have been used to modify the Buildable Lands Inventory (BLI) which is used to project future growth of the region.

Fixed Guideway Transit Station Proximity and Real Estate Rents with Implications for Transit and Land Use Planning 
Chris Nelson, University of Arizona
There is a dearth of systematic research into the relationship between such fixed guideway transit (FGT) systems as light rail transit (LRT), streetcar transit (SCT), bus rapid transit (BRT) and commuter rail transit (CRT) on real estate rents with respect to transit station proximity. Though there are numerous case studies of individual systems in individual metropolitan areas, they focus mostly on one property type. Those studies also vary in the type of data used, methodologies, and functional form specifications. In other words, research lacks a consistent cross section approach to estimate variation in real estate rents between FGT systems and different types of real estate. This presentation will provide that cross-section regression analysis that uses CoStar, census, and GIS-derived location data in a common methodology to estimate the association between FGT station proximity and office, retail and multifamily rents. In all, more than 40 FGT systems are studied serving more than 30 metropolitan areas. Numerous variables are used to control for structure attributes, occupancy, socioeconomic characteristics, land use, location and other influences. Implications for fixed guideway transit system and land use planning are offered.

Moving Fourth Plain Forward: Trying To Get (and Stay) Ahead of Displacement in Central Vancouver
Andrea Pastor, City of Vancouver, WA
In 2015, during the planning stages of C-TRAN’s Bus Rapid Transit line, the City of Vancouver concentrated many of its housing and economic development efforts to its International District. The Vine, as the BRT is known, runs through Clark County’s most diverse neighborhoods, and also its most economically disenfranchised. The City anticipated that a major transportation infrastructure investment ran the risk of displacing the very communities the BRT project was attempting to serve. Since then, the City and over 30 local agency partners, have come together in an innovative cross-sector coalition to focus supports and resources, as well as policy advocacy efforts along key central Vancouver neighborhoods in an effort to pre-empt displacement of people from their communities, and to help people develop the resilience needed to withstand economic shocks brought on by speculation surrounding large public investments.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Lisa Bates, PhD

Lisa Bates, PhD

Associate Professor, Toulan School of Urban Studies & Planning, Portland State University
Lisa K. Bates is associate professor at the Toulan School of Urban Studies & Planning of Portland State University.  She does research related to housing policy and planning. Her work is particularly focused on social justice issues, including understanding how inequitable outcomes... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Pastor

Andrea Pastor

Associate Economic Development Planner, City of Vancouver, Washington
Andrea Pastor manages the implementation of the Fourth Plain Forward Action Plan, a multi-year effort to build the economic resilience of Vancouver’s poorest neighborhoods. She has worked in housing and economic development policy for five years, in both private and public spheres... Read More →
avatar for Chris Nelson, PhD

Chris Nelson, PhD

Professor, University of Arizona
Arthur C. Nelson is the PI for such NITC projects as "Do TODs Make a Difference?" and "National Study of BRT Development Outcomes." These reports have led to more than a dozen manuscripts that have been published, accepted for publication, or in review. They have also been featured in webinars, press conferences, news media outlets, and academic and professional conferences. Nelson pioneered the genre of research... Read More →
avatar for Al Mowbray

Al Mowbray

Associate GIS Specialist, Metro Data Resource Center
After completing a degree in Fine Arts from Iowa State University, I ran away to the Peace Corps for two years where I met my wife and began my professional journey toward science and conservation.  After settling in Oregon in 2004 I spent some time doing science education and environmental... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

10:15am

Active Mobility for All Ages and Abilities: Policy, Community Investment, and Design
The Right of Her Way: Reducing Barriers to Elderly Women Walking 
Cassandra Leopold, Wisconsin Department of Transportation
This research investigates barriers to elderly women walking, how these barriers impact travel, and what can be done to improve mobility. To better understand these barriers and determine best practices, this paper analyzes a series of interviews with multimodal planners, age-friendly coordinators, and social entrepreneurs in Detroit, Cleveland, and Pittsburgh. These professionals offer insight into how public and private organizations can improve the mobility of elderly women through public policy, community investment, and universal design.

Engaging Youth to Choose Car-Free Mobility
Autumn Shafer, University of Oregon
Today’s youth are tomorrow’s riders, bikers, walkers, voters, and transportation planners. As more transit agencies begin to offer free fare passes to public middle and high school students, it is important to have good communication strategy in place to encourage transit usage so they don't miss out on the potential to affect behavior change. Transit agencies need to develop age-appropriate messaging strategies and tactics that promote youth car-free mobility. This presentation will share a NITC-funded research project that sought to understand how Portland youth perceive car-free mobility and get their feedback on communication messaging that encourage car-free transportation options. While there is no "one size fits all" approach, the Portland-based findings may yield insights that could be adapted for application in other regions.

Teen & Tween Girls: The Next Generation of Bicyclists 
Jennifer Dill, Portland State University and Kerry Aszklar, Portland State University
The gender gap in bicycling for transportation in the U.S. starts at a young age. If want more women to ride, we need to also encourage girls to ride. This talk will review rates of cycling among girls both here and abroad and some of the reasons for the gap locally, We will draw on data from the Family Activity Study that collected data from over 300 families in Portland over two years and found that teen and tween girls' attitudes about cycling shifted over that time. We will then review some efforts across the U.S. to encourage more girls to ride.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Ivis García Zambrana, PhD

Ivis García Zambrana, PhD

Assistant Professor, University of Utah
Ivis García Zambrana is an Assistant Professor in City and Metropolitan Planning (CMP). At CMP she works in close collaboration with the University Neighborhood Partners (UNP) and she is also affiliated with the Metropolitan Research Center (MRC). Her philosophy, methodology, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kerry Aszklar

Kerry Aszklar

MURP Graduate, Portland State University
Kerry Aszklar aspires to shift the use of our public space away from auto-dominance towards serving people and communities. She recently graduated with a Masters in Urban and Regional Planning from Portland State University, focusing her group capstone project on human-powered mobility... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Dill, PhD

Jennifer Dill, PhD

Director, Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC), Portland State University
Director of TREC and the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), Jennifer is also a professor of urban studies and planning. She is an internationally cited researcher on sustainable transportation. Among her research projects are Lessons from the Green Lanes... Read More →
avatar for Cassandra Leopold

Cassandra Leopold

Multimodal Planner, Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Cassandra Leopold received her Master's in Urban Planning from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, focusing on multimodal transportation planning and design. Her thesis research focuses on improving accessibility and equity policies for women and elderly pedestrians. She currently... Read More →
avatar for Autumn Shafer, PhD

Autumn Shafer, PhD

Assistant Professor, University of Oregon
Autumn Shafer is a native of the Pacific Northwest. Her research seeks to address important social, theoretical, and practical issues related to public health promotion and social issues advocacy. Her research typically involves designing and evaluating strategic communication campaigns... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

10:15am

Fair and Accurate Data: Equity-informed Approach to Representation
Research Justice: A racial justice approach to data
Shweta Moorthy, Coalition of Communities of Color
This session presents research findings and calls to action by communities of color living in Washington County described in the Coalition of Communities of Color's (CCC) Leading With Race: Research Justice in Washington County report. Racism is the underlying condition of our lived experiences. However, mainstream research practices into how racism impacts and marginalizes communities and how to achieve equity are often exploitative and unjust. Communities are not given much space to lead research that is about them. How do communities experience housing instability? How do communities use parks and recreation? How are we impacted by climate change? These experiences are continuously dismissed as anecdotal, while at the same time, policy practitioners remain puzzled about why policies are not having the desired equity impact. This session will present a vision and implementation of research justice in Washington County that is based on the premise that research practices intended to produce knowledge of lived experiences of communities of color should be just and equitable to achieve the racial equity we seek in the region.

Hard-to-Count Populations: Reaching Underrepresented Voices
Amy Lubitow, Portland State University
This presentation will use data from focus groups held in Portland, OR in 2018-2019 that explored barriers to completing household transportation surveys. Suggestions for tailoring surveys to enhance completion rates for low-income households and non-native English speakers will be discussed.

Voices from the Field: Strategies to Increase Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Education  
Noelle Fields, University of Texas at Arlington
This mixed-methods study explored how engineers, planners, and social workers interact around issues of transportation and transportation equity, and identified opportunities for enhanced collaboration and training in anticipation of emerging transportation needs for environmental justice (EJ) populations. The study also identified strategies for using two Android apps (Safe Activity and My Amble) developed at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA), designed for collecting transportation activity data. Specific recommendations for interdisciplinary collaboration/education are offered.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Francesca Patricolo

Francesca Patricolo

Planner, Policy Innovation and Regional Collaboration, Portland Bureau of Transportation, City of Portland
Francesca Patricolo is a Planner in the Policy Innovation and Regional Collaboration section of the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation. She specializes in addressing complex and contentious planning and public policy issues, as well as designing and advising on community engagement... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Shweta Moorthy, PhD

Shweta Moorthy, PhD

Researcher, Coalition of Communities of Color
Shweta joined the Coalition of Communities of Color in March 2016 after a stint as faculty at Northern Illinois University where she conducted research on forced migration. Being an immigrant woman of color, Shweta uses a transnational lens to understand and participate in ‘local... Read More →
avatar for Amy Lubitow, PhD

Amy Lubitow, PhD

Associate Professor of Sociology, Portland State University
Amy Lubitow is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Portland State University. She teaches courses and conducts research on issues related to transportation justice, environmental justice, and social sustainability. Her most recent research projects examine: 1) gendered and sexual... Read More →
avatar for Noelle Fields, PhD

Noelle Fields, PhD

Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Arlington
Dr. Noelle Fields is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Texas at Arlington. She is a gerontology health researcher specializing in family caregiving among vulnerable populations and home- and community-based services for older adults... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

11:45am

Lunch in the Ballroom
Thursday September 19, 2019 11:45am - 12:15pm
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

12:15pm

Welcome: Jennifer Dill, Portland State University
Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Dill, PhD

Jennifer Dill, PhD

Director, Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC), Portland State University
Director of TREC and the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), Jennifer is also a professor of urban studies and planning. She is an internationally cited researcher on sustainable transportation. Among her research projects are Lessons from the Green Lanes... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 12:15pm - 12:30pm
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

12:30pm

Keynote: Ben Wellington "Shaping a City with Open Data"
Shaping a City with Open Data

Across the world, the Open Data movement is growing and more and more cities are releasing data to the public.  As citizens push for more openness, it is fair to ask: what can we do with all of this data to make our cities better?  In this talk, Ben will explore how he uses his blog, I Quant NY, and some data science techniques to make changes in the city he lives in: New York City. From parking ticket geography, to restaurant inspection scores to subway and taxi pricing, he will discuss best practices for data science in the policy space, explore how story telling is an important aspect of data science and highlight the various data-driven interactions he's had with City agencies that have led to infrastructure and policy changes. Along the way, Ben will point out that data science need not always use complicated math and complex programs. He will show examples of the power of simple arithmetic, and show how often it is more about your curiosity and the questions you ask than the complexity of the equations you use.

In addition to being a data scientist and policy analyst, Ben also teaches improv! On the second day of the Transportation and Communities Summit, Ben will be leading a workshop on "Cultivating Leadership Skills through the Power of Improv" (Sept. 20; 9AM - 12PM) at PSU. Add-on workshops are available for an additional cost, and are also open to non-Summit Day (Sept. 19th) attendees.


Speakers
avatar for Ben Wellington, PhD

Ben Wellington, PhD

Data Scientist and Policy Analyst, I Quant NY
Ben Wellington is the creator of I Quant NY, a data science and policy blog that focuses on insights drawn from New York City's public data, and advocates for the expansion and improvement of that data.His data analysis has influenced local government policy including changes in NYC street infrastructure, the way New Yorkers... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

1:30pm

(Break)
Thursday September 19, 2019 1:30pm - 1:45pm
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

1:45pm

How to Talk About Equity
How do we talk about equity? How do we get the conversation started? Join us for a hands-on, interactive discussion on group dynamics, tools, and active engagement towards creating an equitable transportation system.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
  • Discuss national best practices around transportation equity and planning, drawing from the instructor's work at TriMet and the U.S. DOT
  • Review tools available to transportation professionals for understanding the impacts of transportation investments on different population groups
  • Understand the importance of change management in creating an “equity lens” within a public organization
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1 hour of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.


Speakers
avatar for Amber Ontiveros

Amber Ontiveros

Transportation Equity Consultant, Ontiveros and Associates, LLC
Amber’s experience spans two decades of advocating for civil rights among impoverished and minority communities. She is considered a national leader in developing transportation equity policies and programs and an expert in several civil rights laws. Amber created her company, Ontiveros... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

1:45pm

How to Tell Your Story: Distilling Transportation Concepts, Projects and Research
How can you be a better storyteller? People tend to remember what they feel rather than what they know. Local communication experts will explore the power of character-rich storytelling driven by data for transportation researchers, planners, engineers, and stakeholders. The media ecosystem is constantly evolving, and there are different strategies that challenge the traditional pathways and amplify the voices of communities. What are some of the more successful strategies you've seen that circumvent the traditional pathways? Join the panelists for an interactive roundtable session, and leave feeling more confident in telling the story of your transportation project or research.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Steph Routh

Steph Routh

Dean, Portland Underground Grad School
Steph Routh is the director of the Portland Underground Grad School and interim Communications Officer at the Office of Community & Civic Life. She served as the first Executive Director of Oregon Walks and is the co-founder of the Why Isn't Anyone Talking About This? podcast, an exploration of the relationship between justice and the built env... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Hannah Schafer

Hannah Schafer

Capital Projects, Assets and Maintenance Communications Coordinator, Portland Bureau of Transportation, City of Portland
Hannah Schafer is the Capital Projects, Assets and Maintenance Communications Coordinator for the Portland Bureau of Transportation. A born-and-raised Portlander, Hannah spent the first 10 years of her career in Tel Aviv, Israel working on numerous environmental initiatives including... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Theen

Andrew Theen

Journalist, Transportation and Commuting, The Oregonian
Andrew Theen is the The Oregonian/OregonLive’s transportation and commuting reporter (see his stories here). He grew up in Medford and has called Portland home since 2006. He has journalism degrees from the University of Oregon and Northwestern University. Andrew started his journalism career at Oregon Public Broadcasting in 2006 and has been a reporter at The Oregonian since 2012, where... Read More →
avatar for Andrew DeVigal

Andrew DeVigal

Professor of Practice, Chair in Journalism Innovation and Civic Engagement, University of Oregon
Andrew DeVigal is the inaugural Chair in Journalism Innovation and Civic Engagement and the first professor of practice in the School of Journalism and Communication (SOJC). Previously, he served as the multimedia editor at The New York Times, where he helped guide the newspaper’s... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

1:45pm

Lightning Talks on Multimodal Research and Implementation
For the second year in a row, we'll be hosting "pecha kucha style" rapid presentations on the latest and greatest in multimodal transportation research and implementation.

We'll never forget 2017 performance from Brian Davis of Lancaster Streetlab, giving a Shakespearean lament of "The Pedestrian's Tale." See video snippet here (YouTube).

The 2019 "Lightning Talks" lineup:
  • Assessing Viability of Carsharing for Low-Income Communities
    Farah Naz, University of Texas at Arlington
    This study utilizes a mixed methodology including mathematical modeling and qualitative focus group to understand the needs, accessibility, affordability, and willingness to use car-sharing within transportation Environmental Justice (EJ) population. For quantitate analysis, the 2017 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data was used to investigate the effects of individuals’ socio-economic characteristics, travel behavior and technology access on car-sharing usage. The focus group assess awareness of and sense of low-income communities’ willingness to use car-sharing.
  • Autonomous Vehicles and Active Transportation Safety
    Jean Crowther, Alta Planning + Design
    Even with a long-term promise of dramatic gains in traffic safety, the near-term cost of sharing the road with “learning” AVs disproportionately impacts persons who walk, bicycle, or access transit. Alta’s presentation examines the near-term risk of testing AVs in real-world shared-road environments in relation to the long-term expectations of widespread traffic safety benefits, and explores strategies for mitigating safety risks and preserving the livability of the transportation network.
  • Polycentric Development
    Reid Ewing, University of Utah
    This study asks 1) how polycentricity is defined and quantified in planning practices and 2) its transportation benefits. We first conducted a comprehensive review of 126 regional transportation plans (RTPs) across the U.S. Then, using spatial regression and propensity score matching, we identified activity centers in 28 regions and compared travel outcomes between households in centers and those of matched households outside of centers. 
  • The Effects of Transit and Compactness on Regional Economic Outcomes
    Torrey Lyons, University of Utah
    A pervasive assumption in transportation planning is that public transit can act as a moderator on the relationship between spatial mismatch and unemployment and poverty. However, there is little empirical evidence for this assumption. We examine 113 US regions and test whether transit does, in fact, have an observable effect on regional economies. We find that transit is negatively related to unemployment, poverty, and income inequality.
  • Transportation and Planning Challenges in Gateway and Natural Amenity Communities
    Philip Stoker, University of Arizona
    Small towns and cities outside of national parks, major public lands, and other natural amenities throughout the western United States attract tourists and new residents from all over the world because of the quality of life and unique experiences they provide.  It is therefore not surprising that such gateway and natural amenity region (GNAR) communities—including places such as Jackson, Wyoming, and Moab, Utah—are becoming increasingly popular places live and visit.  This Pecha Kucha presentation will illustrate some of the planning and transportation challenges these communities face which we learned about from in-depth case studies and a national questionnaire. 
  • Transportation Experiences Among Former Offenders: Informing a Facility Location Intervention
    Anne Nordberg, University of Texas at Arlington
    Inmates released from detention face a patchwork of logistical hurdles including court-mandated obligations, scarce resources, and mental health services. Transportation networks and services provide the mobility necessary for this population to successfully re-enter society. With a “bottom-up” approach, we reviewed offender experiences of transportation and housing during re-entry. The results will be discussed in relation to our larger project, developing a facility location problem for housing and services to minimize the average travel time.
  • Using Gamification to Provide Transport Behavior Incentives
    Scott Kuznicki, Modern Traffic Consultants
    Current efforts to drive modal change often fail to meet expectations due to a lack of interest and participation from road users.  Punitive measures such as congestion pricing drive dissent more than cooperation, limiting the usefulness of such schemes.  Gamification, on the other hand, has been proven to engage users and drive participation if tied to rewards.  Using a gameplay-based platform, coupled with a system of points, would allow transport agencies to display the contrast between modes related to external costs not typically considered by users, excite users with the prospect of being rewarded for offsetting those costs through choice, and provide high-value incentives without expending precious transportation revenue.
  • Virginia, Have Your Diets Worked?
    Peter Ohlms, Virginia Transportation Research Council
    Although Virginia has some of the nation’s leading (and award-winning) examples of road diets, public opposition continues to emerge when localities propose new Complete Streets retrofits. Will more data help? 

Moderator
avatar for Roger Lindgren, PhD

Roger Lindgren, PhD

Professor & Chair of Civil Engineering, Oregon Tech
Dr. Lindgren is a native of Edmonton, Canada and has over twenty years of engineering and teaching experience. His research interests include traffic flow theory, intelligent transportation systems (ITS), microscopic simulation of urban and rural traffic, as well as pavement design... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jean Crowther

Jean Crowther

New Mobility Group Leader, Alta Planning + Design
Jean Crowther, AICP is a Senior Associate with Alta Planning + Design, a national firm specializing in active transportation and mobility. She leads Alta's New Mobility practice, building on eight years as a bikeshare planning specialist and 15 years of planning for mobility options... Read More →
avatar for Torrey Lyons, PhD

Torrey Lyons, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Torrey Lyons is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he is working under Dr. Noreen McDonald. He received his Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies from the University of Vermont, a Master of Public Policy from the University of Utah... Read More →
avatar for Reid Ewing, PhD

Reid Ewing, PhD

Distinguished Professor, University of Utah
Reid Ewing, Ph.D., is a Distinguished Professor of City and Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah, associate editor of the Journal of the American Planning Association, and columnist for Planning magazine. He holds master’s degrees in Engineering and City Planning from... Read More →
avatar for Anne Nordberg, PhD

Anne Nordberg, PhD

Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Texas at Arlington
Dr. Nordberg is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at The University of Texas at Arlington.  She earned a joint PhD in Social Science and Social Worker at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the lived experiences of justice-involved people. She studies innovative... Read More →
avatar for Scott Kuznicki

Scott Kuznicki

President, Modern Traffic Consultants
Scott O. Kuznicki is a traffic operations and safety engineer bringing bold ideas to the new mobility world.  His work and speaking engagements throughout the world are a testament to his willingness to learn and observe without borders.  He has delivered cutting-edge and innovative... Read More →
avatar for Farah Naz

Farah Naz

PhD Student, University of Texas at Arlington
Ms. Farah Naz is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington. She graduated with her master’s in transportation engineering from Northeastern University. She is the Vice president of UTA ITE student chapter. Her research focuses... Read More →
avatar for Peter Ohlms

Peter Ohlms

Research Scientist, Virginia Transportation Research Council
Peter Ohlms, AICP, researches bicycle/pedestrian, transit, and planning topics for the Virginia DOT’s research division, the Virginia Transportation Research Council. He has over 10 years of experience in multimodal transportation planning and is usually a bike commuter and occasionally... Read More →
avatar for Philip Stoker, PhD

Philip Stoker, PhD

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona
Philip Stoker is an Assistant Professor of Planning and Landscape Architecture in the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture. Philip holds a Ph.D. in Metropolitan Planning, Policy, and Design from the University of Utah where he completed his thesis on urban... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

1:45pm

Student Poster Design Competition
2019 STUDENT POSTER DESIGN COMPETITION
We will be hosting our annual Student Poster Design Competition which will highlight the innovative thinking coming out of transportation students. Student Poster Presenters from NITC-funded* universities are eligible for a chance to win a cash prize (and, the glory). Poster submissions are now closed.

SPONSORS OF THE NEXT GENERATION
Thank you to the Student Poster sponsors Ride Report and Jacobs Engineering for supporting this program. Interested in sponsoring the Student Poster Design Competition? Contact Cait McCusker at cmccusker@pdx.edu.

STUDENT POSTERS AT TCS 2019
  • Gabby Abou-Zeid, Graduate Student, Civil Engineering, Portland State University
    Walkability in Tucson, AZ
  • Jobaidul Alam Boni, Graduate Research Assistant and Doctoral Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    Evaluating Startup Loss Time of Signalized Intersection Due to Technology Induced Driving Behavior
  • Sandeep Chandrasekhar, Master of Science Sports Product Design, University of Oregon
    Head SPAAS Helmet: Safety. Security. Accessibility
  • Matt Dixon, Graduate Research Assistant / Candidate, Master of Real Estate Development, University of Arizona
    Good, Bad, and Ugly: Transit Station Accessibility and Commercial Real Estate Rents
  • Robert Hibberd, Graduate Research Assistant, Doctoral Student, University of Arizona
    Functional Form in Hedonic Regression: Determining the End of Significance of Transit Proximity Effects on Property Value Uplift
  • Shirin Kamali Rad, Graduate Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    Role of Transportation and Land Use to Health Outcomes in US Metropolitan Areas:  Associations between Transportation, Air Quality and Health
  • Abolfazl Karimpour, Graduate Research Assistant, University of Arizona
    Speed Enforcement Strategy for Mixed Traffic Conditions: Analysis of Behavioral Effects and Drivers' Compliance
  • Katherine Keeling, Civil Engineering, Portland State University
    Evaluation of Bus-Bicycle and Bus/Right-Turn Traffic Delays and Conflicts
  • Sheida Khademi, Graduate Research Assistant/ Doctoral Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    Housing Assignment to improve community health & safety
  • Xiaobo Ma, Graduate Research Assistant, University of Arizona
    Statistical Evaluation of Data Requirement for Ramp Metering Performance Assessment: A Case Study of SR-51, Arizona
  • Karen Mason, Master of Community and Regional Planning Candidate, University of Oregon
    E-Scooters in Eugene, Oregon: Recommendations for Regulations
  • December Maxwell, Doctoral Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    Healthcare Access and Social Engagement among Older Minority Adults: Experiences of Navigating Transportation Barriers 
  • Michael McQueen, MS Civil Engineering Candidate, Graduate Research Assistant, Portland State University
    How E-Bike Incentive Programs are Used to Expand the Market
  • Farah Naz, Ph.D. Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    A comparative analysis of paratransit and on-demand ridesharing: riders and their travel pattern 
  • Sabina Roan, Master of Urban and Regional Planning Candidate, Portland State University
    Ready Streets: Human Powered Mobility in the Post-earthquake Recovery Period
  • Catherine Rohan, Master of Community and Regional Planning Candidate, University of Oregon
    Planning for New Mobility in Gresham, Oregon
  • Sarah Robinson, Doctoral Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    Solving Transportation Inequities Through Car-Share and Ride-Share Programs: Provider Perspectives
  • Kelly Rodgers, PhD Student, Portland State University
    Paradigm conflicts implementing Vision Zero in the 2018 Portland Regional Transportation Plan 
  • Afshin Shamsshooli, Doctoral Candidate, University of Texas at Arlington
    Adaptive-optical-comb-enabled integrated multi-species gas analysis platform
  • Kate Wihtol, Master of Urban and Regional Planning Graduate, Portland State University
    Living Streets: A pathway toward inclusive, equitable, and accessible pedestrian streets
  • Huajie Yang, Graduate Research Assistant, Portland State University
    Effects of light rail transit on transit ridership and traffic congestion at the regional level

2017 STUDENT POSTER WINNERS
We took a year off from the competition in 2018, but here are the winning designs from 2017:

  1. Sirwan Shahooei, Graduate Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    Operation Design and Demand Estimation of a Public Transit System for City of Arlington
  2. Abolfazl Karimpour, Graduate Research Assistant, University of Arizona
    Short-Term Truck Travel Time Prediction Using a Robust Hybrid Model
  3. Sheida Khademi, Graduate Student, University of Texas at Arlington
    Public Health Performance Measures and Their Role in the Regional Metropolitan Transportation Planning Process

*The National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC) is a U.S. DOT funded program and a Portland State-led partnership with the University of Oregon, Oregon Institute of Technology, University of Utah, University of Arizona, and University of Texas at Arlington.

Sponsors & Community Partners
avatar for Jacobs Engineering

Jacobs Engineering

Jacobs Engineering provides solutions for a more connected, sustainable world. Our transportation planning and design group brings a full suite of transportation planning and design services, from long-range system plans, to NEPA assistance, cost estimates and design services to implementing... Read More →
avatar for Ride Report

Ride Report

Ride Report translates between city staff and mobility operators to create sustainable, efficient, and equitable transportation systems. Uniquely positioned to facilitate information sharing between cities and operators, Ride Report helps cities overcome the different processes and... Read More →



Thursday September 19, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

3:00pm

(Break)
Thursday September 19, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

3:30pm

Prioritizing the Transit Dependent Rider: Cross-pollination of Policy Reform in Housing and Transportation
New transit investments often attract high-income residents, yet public transportation is essential and must remain available for those who need it most: transit-dependent riders. Families with low incomes are disproportionately impacted by transportation investments due to gentrification and displacement. It is critical that we prioritize investment in housing in tandem with transit, so that low-income families don’t lose out on essential transportation options. This session will focus on strategies to encourage the development of affordable housing near transit, including empowering cities to make the most of available land by supporting higher-density development in urban areas.

Moderator
avatar for Aaron Golub, PhD

Aaron Golub, PhD

Director, Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University
Dr. Golub is director of the Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning and a professor of urban studies & planning at Portland State University (PSU), moving to PSU after eight years at Arizona State University and ten years studying and working in the San Francisco Bay Area. His... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Steve Messinetti

Steve Messinetti

President and CEO, Habitat for Humanity
Steve has Habitat in his blood. Working for Habitat for Humanity International straight out of college and then moving to the President and CEO position at the Portland affiliate, Steve has worked for the organization for over 25 years. In the past 13 years with Portland/Metro East... Read More →
avatar for Pamela Phan

Pamela Phan

Policy & Organizing Director, Community Alliance of Tenants
Pam Phan joined us as CAT’s Policy and Organizing Director in December of 2016 to build a strong and nimble organizing department that responds to the dynamic political environment at statewide and local levels. Most recently, Pam has organized with youth, immigrants, refugees... Read More →
avatar for Marisa Zapata, PhD

Marisa Zapata, PhD

Associate Professor of Land-use Planning, Portland State University
As an educator, scholar, and planner, Dr. Zapata is committed to achieving spatially - based social justice by preparing planners to act in the face of the uncertain and inequitable futures we face. She believes how we use land reflects our social and cultural values. Dr. Zapata’s... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

3:30pm

E-Scooters, Electric Buses, and E-Bikes - Oh My
The E-Bike Potential: Addressing Our Climate Crisis by Incentivizing Active Transportation
John MacArthur, Portland State University
Many U.S. cities have climate crisis goals for reducing automotive vehicles miles traveled (VMT) in order to reduce tailpipe emissions, so they make neighborhood greenways and car-free bridges hoping the choked arterials will be left behind. But that mass migration isn't happening. How do we reach the untapped potential for new bicyclists? Wider adoption of e-bikes might be the answer. This presentation will share research from multiple projects supported by nationwide data. We'll explore the potential effects of that mode shift, as well as techniques to develop and structure e-bike incentive programs to reduce that barrier through four main programs: Partial Purchase Subsidies, Vendor-Funded Discounts, Employer-Sponsored Programs, and Government Sponsored Loans. What could Portland's future look like with a fleet of e-bikes in the city's bike share program?

Small Vehicles, Big Impact: Measuring Micromobility Impacts 
Jean Crowther, Alta Planning + Design
From bike share to scootershare, micromobility systems are part of a larger shift toward expanding options for first and last mile access to transit, rightsizing modes, and on-demand transportation. But do the benefits outweigh the challenges? This presentation will walk through recent studies of micromobility usage in 3 metro areas to understand the data available, approaches to analyses, and interpreting results.

The Switch is On: TriMet’s Roadmap to Zero Emissions
Young Park, TriMet
As Oregon’s largest transit provider, TriMet is taking a significant step toward a greener future for our riders, region and the state. TriMet’s conversion to a non-diesel bus fleet will begin with buses powered by electricity. Although the prospect of electrification is promising and the benefits of battery electric buses are many, we must also understand the limitations posed by the current state of electric vehicle technology. Young will present the implementation tools and steps TriMet is undertaking to scale up supporting charging infrastructure for battery electric buses.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Ingrid Fish

Ingrid Fish

Policy & Research Analyst, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, City of Portland
Ingrid Fish currently serves as the City of Portland’s Electric Vehicle Policy Lead. She is managing the City’s 2016 Electric Vehicle Strategy update process and coordinates with stakeholders to implement electric vehicle related Climate Action Plan and Electric Vehicle Strategy... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Young Park

Young Park

Senior Project Manager, Bus Electrification, TriMet
Young Park’s studies, profession and lifestyle are devoted to protecting and enhancing the environment through public transportation.  This dedication was born out of 28-year public policy and management career of translating technology and resource management into practical transportation... Read More →
avatar for John MacArthur

John MacArthur

Sustainable Transportation Program Manager / Research Associate, Transportation Research and Education Center, Portland State University
Mr. MacArthur currently manages a complex Federal Transit Administration (FTA) grant to Develop and Test an Emergency Transportation Recovery Plan for the Portland, Oregon Region. This project requires close coordination and collaboration with a variety of public agency partners including... Read More →
avatar for Jean Crowther

Jean Crowther

New Mobility Group Leader, Alta Planning + Design
Jean Crowther, AICP is a Senior Associate with Alta Planning + Design, a national firm specializing in active transportation and mobility. She leads Alta's New Mobility practice, building on eight years as a bikeshare planning specialist and 15 years of planning for mobility options... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union (3rd Flr Ballroom) 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

3:30pm

Data-informed Solutions to Arterial Travel Performance Measures
Applications of Multi-Source Traffic Data for Urban Mobility Improvement 
Yao-Jan Wu, University of Arizona
Transportation agencies have invested a great deal amount of funding in intelligent transportation systems, especially traffic sensor technologies, to better manage traffic and reduce congestion. However, not all agencies have fully utilized the capacities of the advanced technologies. This presentation aims at providing data-driven solutions to enhancing traffic data usability for performance measurement for responsive traffic management and operations. Several case studies and applications currently being accomplished in Arizona will be also discussed.

Travel Time Metrics and Temporal Effects: Analysis of Urban Arterials Using Bluetooth Data
Jason Anderson, Portland State University
Recently, the Portland Metropolitan area was ranked in the top ten for worst congested cities in the United States. As a result, travel time reliability has substantially worsened. Although travel time reliability has been shown to be equally important as average travel time, a vast amount of literature does not focus on reliability. In addition, arterials are rarely the focus of travel-time- related research and the temporal effects on travel time are not quantified. Therefore, this work temporally analyzes travel time reliability on three urban arterials using Bluetooth detector data. To quantify the effects of temporal-related factors, the current study also applies a bivariate Tobit model. Results show that temporal-related factors and travel direction have significant impacts on both travel time reliability metrics and effects on expected travel time.

Signal Performance Measures: Aggregation and Advanced Tools
Alison Tanaka, Kittelson & Associates, Inc.
As our communities become more connected, data from traffic signals, vehicles, and even people is becoming increasingly available. Signal performance measures provide one method for turning that data into information that an agency can use to prioritize activities, assess operations, and inform others about the traffic signal system. Automated traffic signal performance measures (ATSPMs) are picking up momentum across the country, and new tools are being developed daily to better aggregate and analyze the information. Learn more about the newest innovations in signal performance measurement and how you can put ATSPMs to work in your community.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This session is eligible for 1.5 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Moderator
avatar for Kate Freitag

Kate Freitag

Traffic Operations Engineer, Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT)
Kate Freitag, P.E. has worked for Oregon Department of Transportation for over 20 years in the Region 1 Traffic section. As the Region 1 Traffic Engineer, her focus is safe and efficient operations for all users of the transportation system. She is the program lead for traffic operations... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alison Tanaka

Alison Tanaka

Senior Engineer, Kittelson & Associates
Alison Tanaka is a Senior Engineer with Kittelson & Associates, Inc. with a background in traffic signal systems and intelligent transportation systems (ITS). She has experience taking traffic signal projects from planning through construction, including complex interactions with... Read More →
avatar for Jason Anderson, PhD

Jason Anderson, PhD

Research Associate, Portland State University
Dr. Anderson’s current area of research include: transportation safety modeling, spatial econometrics and statistics, and big data analysis focusing on various concepts (e.g., traffic flow, travel time, freight commodity analyses, methodological approaches, etc.). Dr. Anderson’s... Read More →
avatar for Yao-Jan Wu, PhD

Yao-Jan Wu, PhD

Associate Professor, University of Arizona
Dr. Yao-Jan Wu is an associate professor of transportation engineering and the Director of Smart Transportation Lab in the Civil and Architectural Engineering and Mechanics at the University of Arizona (UA). Dr. Wu’s research interests highlight a strong connection between information... Read More →


Thursday September 19, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

5:00pm

Happy Hour and Reception
Thursday September 19, 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201
 
Friday, September 20
 

8:00am

Continental Breakfast + Check In
Friday September 20, 2019 8:00am - 8:30am
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

9:00am

Workshop: Applying New Strategic Planning Tools from the VisionEval Framework
Workshops are open to anyone: You do not need to be registered for the main Summit Day in order to purchase a workshop ticket. This half-day workshop cost $95. If you are a student or employee of a nonproft, reach out to get a discount code for 50% off.

VisionEval is an open source framework for building and running disaggregate strategic planning models.  VisionEval was originally developed by Oregon DOT and development is ongoing through a pooled fund involving 7 states, 3 Metropolitan Planning Organizations and the Federal Highway Administration.  A morning workshop targets basic users developing such models.  Workshop participants will receive basic guidance on how to set up and run models in the VisionEval environment, and sufficient understanding of the methods, inputs and outputs to begin using the model for supporting planning applications.  The focus of the morning training will be to summarize at a high-level the main model components (packages) and key concepts of the VisionEval Strategic Planning models.  The goal is to assist the basic user in understanding the model methods, to aid in developing model inputs and evaluating outputs. Github, associated application materials, and suggested pre-work will be made available beforehand so participants can get the most out of the training.
Trainers: Jeremy Raw/FHWA, Dan Flynn/Volpe, Tara Weidner/OregonDOT
Learning Objectives
  • Welcome and Introductions (10 min)
  • RSPM Design Considerations (20 min).  Discuss the rationale for VisionEval models, the types of tools provided, the high-level architecture, and how the tools are applied on a particular project
  • Using the Tool (60 min). Installation, how inputs are structured and edited, reporting and reviewing outputs, overview of running models and scenarios
  • Review Key Concepts from modules (2 hrs). Look in detail at the components of VisionEval and what they do, in order to understand how to apply the model’s capabilities to your own planning problems.
  • Resources/Wrap-up (10 min)
Expected Knowledge Base of Morning Workshop Participants:
Has a minimal knowledge of the R programming language and intermediate knowledge of travel modeling concepts. Early versions of VisionEval use the R, rather than GUI environment, which will require some level of R familiarity to enter and run r-commands via R-Studio or the command line. Input CSV files can be developed/processed in various programs such as Excel or a text editor.


Participant “Homework” (Beforehand):
Participants will find the following preparations helpful in order to get the most out of the workshop:

1. VisionEval website. This is the official website and includes official code and supporting Github resources by the FHWA/Volpe-led Pooled Fund, along with background information on VisionEval tools, case studies, etc.

2. VE-RSPM Schematic. Schematic includes a short summary of VE-RSPM model steps and components. This is the road map to the main steps that make up the VE-RSPM tool. The training will identify the methods underlying these steps, describe how various inputs/default data are used to develop data used in other steps and ultimately impact final outputsYou should be thoroughly familiar with this framework document.

3. VE-RSPM Tutorials Wiki. These Github resources include everything and more that will be covered in the training. Become generally familiar with the modules, the inputs, and the outputs, and how to navigate the sections of this Github Wiki. Please note that documentation is in draft form and some changes are still underway.

4. High-Level Inputs by Geography. This is a quick guide for planners about the various inputs and policy actions in the model at the different geographic scales for both VE-RSPM and VE-State. The associated model geographies are explained.

5. Summary File List. This is a complete searchable/filterable list of all VE-RSPM inputs and modules. For Oregon applications, see tag of Oregon categories and shading for where Oregon default values are available.

6. Understand how VisionEval relates to other modeling approaches. The VisionEval strategic tool niche and associated level of detail relative to other models is also supported by this Oregon specific Tools overview document (see p. 1-2 “Spectrum of Analysis Needs”) as it has a quick summary of VisionEval tools for GHG analysis (see p. 25-28) and comparable information for other GHG analysis tools. For the training, you should understand the niche of VisionEval and its general code approach (e.g., in contrast to traditional travel demand models), and thus the appropriate level of detail for VisionEval inputs.

7. (Optional) Code Download & Install website. Use the VisionEval installer* to download the latest version of the code and sample inputs. Your value from the training would be greatly facilitated by downloading, installing, and running the VE-RSPM model. For install/run-time questions, please contact Jeremy Raw at jeremy.raw@dot.gov.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This half-day workshop is eligible for 3 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Flynn, PhD

Dan Flynn, PhD

Data Scientist, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
Dan Flynn, Ph.D., is a data scientist in the Energy Analysis and Sustainability Division at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. Dan conducts research on a range of topics in transportation, including use of crowdsourced traffic data to improve safety, as well as contributing... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Raw

Jeremy Raw

Community Planner, Federal Highway Administration
Jeremy Raw, P.E., works in the FHWA Office of Planning where he has reviewed numerous traffic and land use forecasts for NEPA studies. He recently led a team that updated instructions for FHWA staff reviewing such forecasts. Jeremy also coordinates research and deployment of advanced... Read More →
avatar for Tara Weidner

Tara Weidner

Integrated Transportation Analysis Engineer, Oregon Department of Transportation
Tara Weidner is an Integrated Transportation Analysis Engineer in ODOT’s Transportation Planning Analysis Unit (TPAU). She has over 20 years of experience in modeling and analysis of multi-modal transportation systems. She holds Bachelor’s and Master's degrees in Transportation... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

9:00am

Workshop: Cultivating Leadership Skills through the Power of Improv
Workshops are open to anyone: You do not need to be registered for the main Summit Day in order to purchase a workshop ticket. This half-day workshop cost $95. If you are a student or employee of a nonproft, reach out to get a discount code for 50% off.

This interactive leadership workshop will give participants a chance to try something most have never attempted before -- improvised comedy. The workshop emphasizes the basic principles of improv: accepting and building on the ideas of others, listening, building self confidence, and spontaneity - all important to the practice of strong leadership. Through various exercises, participants will learn that they are at their best when they commit to their decisions and take bold action. Planners, engineers, researchers, and students can apply these skills in managing interdisciplinary teams, in effectively communicating at open house forums, presenting research posters, and more.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This half-day workshop is eligible for 3 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Wellington, PhD

Ben Wellington, PhD

Data Scientist and Policy Analyst, I Quant NY
Ben Wellington is the creator of I Quant NY, a data science and policy blog that focuses on insights drawn from New York City's public data, and advocates for the expansion and improvement of that data.His data analysis has influenced local government policy including changes in NYC street infrastructure, the way New Yorkers... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

9:00am

Workshop (Full Day): Design Thinking Tactics for Urban Development
Workshops are open to anyone: You do not need to be registered for the main Summit Day in order to purchase a workshop ticket. This full-day workshop cost $190. If you are a student or employee of a nonproft, reach out to get a discount code for 50% off.

This full-day Design Thinking training purposefully walks participants through design thinking exercises that will present a process overview, explore how Design Thinking methods can be used to understand the challenges facing transportation in our rapidly changing cities, and offer deep dives into how the Design Thinking mindset can be infused into our working communities.

FULL DAY AGENDA
Individual Purpose & Introduction--> Ice breaker to get to know each other from a purpose driven perspective.
Design Thinking Process Introduction--> Brief overview of Design Thinking
Design Thinking Process Integration--> Discuss where DT supplements current modes of working and how it best shines
Design Thinking Mindset Exercise--> Intentionally sets participants in the right frame of mind
Human-Centered Innovation--> Set up a team-based challenge to work on throughout the day
Empathy Mapping--> Drive deep connections to our residents, businesses, visitors, humans in our communities
Problem Statement--> Making sure we are working on the right problem with the right tools
Ideation--> How do we develop ideas with a human-centered approach
Idea Evaluation--> Evaluation of early ideas and how to let the evaluative process drive future iterations
Prototype for feedback--> Using prototypes as a communication device, how feedback drives iteration
Implementation--> How and when do we move to implementation with and for our community?
Rose, Bud, Thorn--> What do we like, what are we hopeful for, what was a pain?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • This high engagement activity will provide a visceral understanding of the Design Thinking mindset.
  • Highlight how Design Thinking methodologies will lead to better transportation-focused solutions for communities and the people who interact with them.
  • Participants will work in small teams to complete the exercise; forming deep connection with a network of like-minded industry colleagues resulting in future collaboration opportunity.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This full-day workshop is eligible for 7 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Tucker

Katherine Tucker

Transformation Designer, WERK_
Katherine (Katie) Tucker is a Design and Innovation Professional co-rooted in industry and academia. Katie is a classically trained Designer, by way of Architecture, with a focused lens on business and entrepreneurship.   Katie is the founder of WERK_, an innovation consulting firm... Read More →
avatar for Stef Koehler

Stef Koehler

Partnering Consultant, WERK_
Stef is the Founder of Green Crane Innovation, an eco-design firm, as well as partnering consultant with Werk_, an innovation consulting firm, specializing in moments of critical transformation. She also teaches a course called Design Futures and Ecologies in the MA of Collaborative... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 4:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

12:00pm

Lunch + Afternoon Check-In
Friday September 20, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Workshop: Developing and Deploying New Planning Tools with the VisionEval Framework
Workshops are open to anyone: You do not need to be registered for the main Summit Day in order to purchase a workshop ticket. This half-day workshop cost $95. If you are a student or employee of a nonproft, reach out to get a discount code for 50% off.

VisionEval is an open source framework for building and running disaggregate strategic planning models. VisionEval can be extended straightforwardly by researchers and other developers. The framework and models are currently in use by a number of State transportation agencies and metropolitan planning organizations. Researchers can benefit by leveraging existing VisionEval modules and models, and deliver their research products in a form that is potentially immediately practical. Workshop participants will learn about the features of VisionEval that lend themselves to “Open Science” practices. Discussions of the design of VisionEval code, embedded datasets and data structures will demonstrate how delivering research results and new analytic techniques can be straightforward. The workshop will use a recent extension developed by PSU researchers to test alternative approaches to VisionEval’s multi-modal travel module as a case study example. Github, associated application materials, and suggested pre-work will be made available beforehand so participants can get the most out of the training.
Trainers: Liming Wang/PSU, Jeremy Raw/FHWA, Brian Gregor/Oregon Systems Analytics
Learning Objectives
  • Welcome and Introductions (10 min)
  • Review of Open Science (10 min) Understand concepts and best practices for reproducible research and open science.
  • VisionEval Attributes supporting Open Science (30 min) Understand how VisionEval supports open science concepts, including documentation, open data and code, testing and reviewing research.
  • Setting up your VisionEval Development Environment (45 minutes) Everything you need to set up a VisionEval development environment and start exploring how to enhance the VisionEval models
  • VE Open Science Example – PSU Multimodal Model (2 hrs) Detailed review of a recent example project that extended the core VisionEval models. Discuss all the code and data requirements for building and integrating a new VisionEval module.
  • Resources/Wrap-up (10 min)
Expected Knowledge Base of afternoon Workshop Participants:  Expected Knowledge Base of Participants is everything requested for the Morning Workshop, plus is comfortable running R functions and writing simple scripts in the R programming language.
 
Participant “Homework” (Beforehand):
The following section outlines homework tasks that participants should complete in advance of the workshop. Hyperlinks to websites are included and relevant documents are attached and referenced by file name in bold text.
  • Be Familiar with All the Items from the Morning Workshop Homework. You should understand the “user level” characteristics of VisionEval in order to be able to make sense of how it is structured internally. You should expect either to take the 9/20 morning workshop, or already be able to do the things covered in that workshop.
Code Download & Install website (Required for Afternoon Workshop). Use the VisionEval installer* to download the latest version of the code and sample inputs. Your value from the training would be greatly facilitated by downloading, installing, and running the VE-RSPM model. For install/run-time questions, please contact Jeremy Raw at jeremy.raw@dot.gov.
  • VisionEval Model System Design Document. This document outlines the approach of how VisionEval modules are implemented in code, how modules work within packages, initialize data input checks, CPI deflators and data “types”, etc.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This half-day workshop is eligible for 3 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Gregor

Brian Gregor

Principal, Oregon Systems Analytics
Brian Gregor has a broad range of transportation and land use planning and analysis experience. He has 16 years of experience in local and state land use and transportation planning and policy development. He has 23 years of experience in transportation and land use research, analysis... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Raw

Jeremy Raw

Community Planner, Federal Highway Administration
Jeremy Raw, P.E., works in the FHWA Office of Planning where he has reviewed numerous traffic and land use forecasts for NEPA studies. He recently led a team that updated instructions for FHWA staff reviewing such forecasts. Jeremy also coordinates research and deployment of advanced... Read More →
avatar for Liming Wang, PhD

Liming Wang, PhD

Associate Professor, Portland State University
Liming Wang is an assistant professor in PSU's Toulan School of Urban Studies & Planning. He teaches courses in Travel Demand Modeling, Transportation and Land Use, and Data Analysis Methods. His research takes a data-driven approach to address challenging issues in planning, in particular... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201

1:00pm

Workshop: QPED Toolkit - Qualitative Pedestrian Environments Data for better, more equitable transportation decision-making
Workshops are open to anyone: You do not need to be registered for the main Summit Day in order to purchase a workshop ticket. This half-day workshop cost $95. If you are a student or employee of a nonproft, reach out to get a discount code for 50% off.

Despite recent emphasis on big data, there are many instances where transportation professionals are better served by data that captures important contextual factors. QPED, developed with funding from the CDC and NITC, gives jurisdictions, advocates, and researchers a systematic, cost-effective approach to learning about neighborhood pedestrian environments from the user perspective through systematic, structured, on-street intercept interviews. The workshop includes an overview of how QPED can inform decision-making around walkability improvements, especially in underserved areas. Participants will be trained on data collection tools, sampling strategies, and coding before having an opportunity to try QPED out on the street for themselves.

Learning Objectives
  • Articulate why an intercept interview might provide important information about pedestrian needs in historically underserved populations or areas.
  • Create a sampling plan which identify appropriate neighborhoods in which to implement intercept interviews within QPED.
  • Articulate best practices for analyzing the qualitative data collected with the QPED instrument and applying findings to transportation-decision making.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
This half-day workshop is eligible for 3 hours of professional development credit for AICP (see our provider summary). We can provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

Speakers
avatar for Arlie Adkins, PhD

Arlie Adkins, PhD

Assistant Professor, University of Arizona
Arlie researches health and safety disparities related to urban transportation systems and equitable access to transportation systems related to housing affordability. He is the co-PI of a five-year CDC grant to investigate barriers to walking and physical activity in Tucson. He has... Read More →
avatar for Maia Ingram

Maia Ingram

Director, Arizona Prevention Research Center
Maia Ingram, MPH, is Co-Director, Arizona Prevention Research Center and Program Director of Community-based Evaluation Projects. She has over 15 years experience developing and evaluating community-based prevention and research programs using the community health worker (promotora... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Iroz-Elardo, PhD

Nicole Iroz-Elardo, PhD

Assistant Research Professor, University of Arizona
Cross-trained in planning and public health, her research focuses on how to plan healthier and more equitable communities. Dr. Iroz-Elardo has a PhD in Urban Studies from Portland State University. Her doctoral research investigated the extent to which Health Impact Assessment provided... Read More →
avatar for Evren Sonmez

Evren Sonmez

Program Manager, Living Streets Alliance
Evren is a program manager at Living Streets Alliance (LSA), a Tucson-based nonprofit organization advocating for a thriving Tucson by creating great streets for all. She initially joined the organization to develop and coordinate a Neighborhood Walkability Assessment Program and... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Smith Memorial Student Union at PSU 1825 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201